Eater's Best Grievances With Restaurants/Food in 2014

On New Years Eve morning I ate a breakfast of leftover egg whites from one of my pastry chef wife's recent concoctions, carrots and zucchini braised in garlic and fish broth, leftover black bean mush from the previous night's dinner - all that mixed together the carpet bombed with chopped arugula and splashed with soy and hot sauce. It was awesome. I ate it and read what the smart food people at Eater, mostly super urbanite editors and writers (not pro cooks and what not), thought about what was sooooo stupid about the food world in 2014. 

I'm not an urbanite, and I don't eat out that often (I eat the weird shit I described above), but most of their qualms are fair, I think, or at least what they chose to prod needed prodding. I used to cover restaurants like this, but nothing of these sorts. Some of it is way over the heads of those of us who don't live in NYC or some equally food forward city, but you'll get the point: restaurants, in general, need to cool it with the trends and just cook good food. 

A few of my favorite moments.  

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I will say that I wish I had all the octopus options that Bill Addison refers to here. I'm down for half-assed, chewy octopus. 
The last thing, mostly. Stop deifying the same chefs over and over again (looking at you, Time magazine.).
 Holy fuck I'm getting sick of the new generation of lifestyle/food bloggers working right now. Local, cough, Milk, cough. Aspirational commercialism at its worst. At the same time, I can't look away. I follow their Instagram feeds. Subscribe to their blogs. Mostly to watch them delete comments that point out how advertorial their entire brand often is. 

Holy fuck I'm getting sick of the new generation of lifestyle/food bloggers working right now. Local, cough, Milk, cough. Aspirational commercialism at its worst. At the same time, I can't look away. I follow their Instagram feeds. Subscribe to their blogs. Mostly to watch them delete comments that point out how advertorial their entire brand often is. 

You are right. There's plenty to hate in the food world, including all the hating, that is more important than brunch. But unless you cover hunger or poverty or farming in your task as a food writer, it's all equally vapid. Brunch sucks. I stand by it. It's for single people working in white collar jobs. It's for college kids. With that said, that New York Times piece was bunk. The last quote gets at it best, that we have to hate in order to define ourselves. How you feel about brunch, though, says much about your current social, geographic and financial status.
Speaks for itself.